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Ritalin Addiction Help-Line
Untitled Document

ADHD Testing

Many parents waste a great deal of money for psychological testing of their ADHD child. There is a myth that  ADHD testing will reveal some underlying, and previously unknown, truth  about what is really wrong with their child. And, in some undefined way this will help. But, testing and diagnosis are only useful if they help you decide which  of real, available treatments would be most useful for your ADD child. strattera concerta adderall  adhd testing adderall strattera concerta ritalin
The majority of real available treatments for ADHD are listed on this web site. There is nothing in psychological evaluations that will provide any help in deciding which treatment is likely to be most successful for your child. So, money spent  is usually wasted.

Choice of treatment for ADHD is on the basis of cost, availability, effectiveness and risk, not on subtle variations in the ADD diagnosis itself. So, before you spend your money, ask those offering testing how different testing outcomes will predict which of the real, available treatments you are considering will be most successful for your child. If they don't give you a persuasive answer, don't spend your money.

Most  attention deficit hyperactivity disorder "testing" consists of checklists of behavior observed at home and in the classroom and filled out by parents and teachers, respectively. The Connors is the most common. Occasionally a more traditional battery of ability and personality tests will be suggested.

It only summarizes what you already know, but it sounds better, more authoritative and meaningful if it is  read to you by a doctor. You know what your child’s problems are before your take him for testing, or you wouldn’t be taking him. After you pay your money, you will have a piece of paper that tells you the things you knew before testing, only in fancier words. This is not a very good return for you investment of time and money. There is a whole section in my book on this issue.

The information provided by testing does not help your child improve, and that is all that counts.  Save your  money for the treatment of your choice.

Information provided courtesy of www.ritalindeath.com

  • Drug Facts
  • Many non-medical users crush the tablets and either snort the resulting powder, or dissolve it in water and "cook" it for intravenous injection.
  • Some street names for Ritalin are : Kibbles and bits, speed, west coast, vitamin R, r-ball, smart drug
  • Ritalin is a Schedule II Controlled Substance. Other Schedule II drugs are Oxycontin and Percocet.
  • According to a new DEA report, in some U.S. schools a staggering 30 percent of students are medicated.